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Ripple et al. 2014 Status and ecological effects of the world’s largest carnivores

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Timms 2014 Aquatic invertebrates of pit gnammas in southwest Australia
Letnic et al. 2014 Artificial watering points are focal points for activity by an invasive herbivore but not native herbivores in conservation reserves in arid Australia
Chagué-Goff et al. 2014 Impact of tsunami inundation on soil salinisation – up to one year after the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami

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CES 2014 Centre for Ecosystem Science Annual Report 2013 View PDF
Bino et al. 2014 Maximizing colonial waterbirds' breeding events using identified ecological thresholds and environmental flow management

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Mishler et al. 2014 Phylogenetic measures of biodiversity and neo- and paleo-endemism in Australian Acacia
Lucas et al. 2014 Mapping forest growth and degradation stage in the Brigalow Belt Bioregion of Australia through integration of ALOS PALSAR and Landsat-derived Foliage Projective Cover (FPC) data
Kingsford et al. 2014 Birds of the Murray-Darling Basin

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Letten and Keith 2014 Phylogenetic and functional dissimilarity does not increase during temporal heathland succession

The compelling idea that closely related species should be less likely to coexist on account of their overlapping needs dates back to Darwin. It follows from Darwin's hypothesis that if species compete more intensely as communities mature, recently assembled communities (such as those emerging in the wake of a fire) will consist of closer relatives than older communities. Researchers from the Centre for Ecosystem Science tested this theory using a long-term dataset of community assembly in fire-prone heathland vegetation. Contrary to expectations, the relatedness of coexisting species tended to increase in the wake of fires, thus challenging this logical extention to one of ecology's oldest hypotheses.

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Brandis et al 2014 Assessing the use of camera traps to measure reproductive success in Straw-necked Ibis breeding colonies

Summary. Nest monitoring may influence reproductive success and rates of predation. This study compared data from two methods of monitoring nests — repeated visits to nests by investigators and collection of data by camera traps — in Straw-necked Ibis Threskiornis spinicollis breeding colonies in the Murrumbidgee catchment in New South Wales. There was no significant difference in reproductive success between nests monitored by these two methods. These data show that (1) nest monitoring using camera traps is a valid survey method that reduces the need for investigators to engage in intensive and costly monitoring in the field, and (2) there was no detectable interference from repeated visits to nests by investigators on the reproductive success of ibis.

Borchard and Eldridge 2014 Does artificial light influence the activity of vertebrates beneath rural buildings?

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Bino et al. 2014 Identifying minimal sets of survey techniques for multi-species monitoring across landscapes: An approach utilising species distribution models

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Schwentner et al. 2014 Evolutionary systematics of the Australian Eocyzicus fauna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Spinicaudata) reveals hidden diversity and phylogeographic structure

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Porter and Kingsford 2014 Aerial Survey of Wetland Birds in Eastern Australia - October 2014 Annual Summary Report View PDF
Binder et al. 2013 Emergence, growth, ageing and provisioning of Providence Petrel (Pterodroma solandri) chicks: implications for translocation

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Kingsford and McCann 2013 Adequacy of environmental assessment of the proposed Macquarie River pipeline to the city of Orange View PDF
Tingley et al. 2013 Identifying optimal barriers to halt the invasion of cane toads Rhinella marina in arid Australia

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Timms 2013 Geomorphology of pit gnammas in southwestern Australia
Ocock et al. 2013 Amphibian chytrid prevalence in an amphibian community in arid Australia

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Boulton et al. 2013 Good news: Progress in successful conservation and restoration.
Bino et al. 2013 Niche evolution in Australian terrestrial mammals? Clarifying scale-dependencies in phylogenetic and functional drivers of co-occurrence

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Ashcroft and Major 2013 Importance of matrix permeability and quantity of core habitat for persistence of a threatened saltmarsh bird

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Pinceel et al. 2013 Fairy shrimps in distress: a molecular taxonomic review of the diverse fairy shrimp genus Branchinella (Anostraca: Thamnocephalidae) in Australia in the light of ongoing environmental change

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Dahm et al. 2013 The role of science in planning, policy and conservation of river ecosystems: Examples from Australia and the United States
Bino et al. 2013 Improving bioregional frameworks for conservation by including mammal distributions

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AWRLC 2013 AWRLC Annual Report 2012 View PDF
Ripple et al. 2013 Widespread mesopredator effects after wolf extirpation

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Keith et al. 2013 Scientific foundations for an IUCN Red List of ecosystems

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Kingsford et al. 2013 Waterbird communities in the Murray-Darling Basin, 1983-2012 View PDF

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